BOOR

09.12.2020by
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  1. BOOR is listed in the World's largest and most authoritative dictionary database of abbreviations and acronyms. BOOR - What does BOOR stand for? The Free Dictionary.
  2. Boor: 1 n a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement Synonyms: Goth, barbarian, churl, peasant, tike, tyke Type of: disagreeable person, unpleasant person a person who is not pleasant or agreeable.

Boortz

Boor - WordReference English dictionary, questions, discussion and forums. On the other hand, Steve felt a boor for having sent the books. Some have no veneer like this boor, and some have the polish, but they are all the same underneath. It was plain to every eye, moreover, that he was a gentleman and no boor. Indeed, without it only a boor or a saint can be really comfortable. Annarie Boor was born in South Africa, before spending her teenage years in Zambia. Having passed her dance teaching exams at the age of 15, she opened a dance school in Lusaka, Zambia where she taught for a number of years before moving to the UK in her early twenties. She subsequently spent a number of years in the Cayman Islands before.

Definitions

BOOR

Boorish Definition

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A person with rude, clumsy manners and little refinement.
  • noun A peasant.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A countryman; a peasant; a rustic; a clown; particularly, a Dutch or German peasant.
  • noun Hence One who is rude in manners, or illiterate; a clown; a clownish person.
  • noun [capitalized] Same as Boer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A husbandman; a peasant; a rustic; esp. a clownish or unrefined countryman.
  • noun A Dutch, German, or Russian peasant; esp. a Dutch colonist in South Africa, Guiana, etc.: a boer.
  • noun A rude ill-bred person; one who is clownish in manners.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A peasant.
  • noun A Boer, white South African of Dutch or Huguenot descent
  • noun A yokel, country bumpkin,
  • noun An uncultured person

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Dutch boer, from Middle Dutch gheboer; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

Booru Hs2

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Examples

  • It's a reversal of the premise of 'Amadeus,' in which the boor is the genius and the court favorite a composer possessing more in the way of political skill than musical gifts.

  • Stanley, for example, was often called a boor and a brute when in reality he was merely hiding a fine nature behind the armour necessary to resist native imposition and worse.

  • Though he is a boor, that is to be expected, as his father is an enlisted man.

  • According to this argument based on self-assertive aggressiveness, the boor was the man possessed of a strong personality, while the gentleman was relatively 'impersonal.'

  • I hear if you watch “Passion of the Christ”, you turn into the kind of boor that says that all sex should be within a context of looking to get married and have babies.

  • I hear if you watch “Passion of the Christ”, you turn into the kind of boor that says that all sex should be within a context of looking to get married and have babies.

  • Rather, it's very clear that Will cut the line because it was an inconvenient impediment to his journalistic goal, which was to portray Webb as a 'boor' who was rude to the Commander in Chief, and to show that this new upstart is a threat to Washington's alleged code of 'civility and clear speaking' (his words).

  • Will calls Webb a 'boor' and a 'pompous poseur' (two phrases that might have popped into Will's mind while shaving in the mirror that morning) and asserts Webb has 'patent disrespect for the presidency'.

  • Rather, it's very clear that Will cut the line because it was an inconvenient impediment to his journalistic goal, which was to portray Webb as a 'boor' who was rude to the Commander in Chief, and to show that this new upstart is a threat to Washington's alleged code of 'civility and clear speaking' his words.

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  • It is only a 'boor' who seeks to impose his own hobbies and interests upon a stranger, disregarding entirely the presumable likes and dislikes of the latter.

Related Words

hypernyms (2)

Words that are more generic or abstract

same context (26)

Words that are found in similar contexts

Comments

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noun

  • A rough and bad-mannered person.

    ‘at last the big obnoxious boor had been dealt a stunning blow for his uncouth and belligerent manner’
    • ‘They see the boor in each of them and they laugh at it.’
    • ‘I daresay you will roast me as a sexist boor, but there, I've said it.’
    • ‘His sister is married to a boor whom he has always loathed and suspects she has come to loathe also.’
    • ‘He and those three sons of his are ill-mannered boors, louts and womanizers.’
    • ‘In Tampa, players who now are among his best friends once considered him a boor and a punk.’
    • ‘There are three counts in my indictment: he was a humourless boor, he was the epitome of negativity and his legend far outstrips his actual achievement.’
    • ‘Call me irresponsible, call me obsessed, call me a boor.’
    • ‘He tries to insinuate himself into her world, but she's not interested in a boor who thinks he can buy his way into her circle.’
    • ‘Those who are delighted by the cathedral of Chartres and the Meninas of Velasquez may think that those who remain unaffected by these marvels are boors.’
    • ‘It might have been about having a choice between behaving like a sportsman or behaving like a boor and doing the latter because it suited him at the time.’
    • ‘That's the kind of enthusiast that is being driven into oblivion by self-serving, loudmouth boors who think that they invented the microprocessor.’
    • ‘And Junior interrupted him, ‘Because we don't like to put up with a bunch of party boors.’’
    • ‘Such rote interpretative strategies betray a lack of imagination, like the cocktail-party boor who laughs at every wisecrack.’
    • ‘The insinuations that he was a cold fish who never talked with players and sometimes conducted himself as a tactless boor are not true.’
    • ‘The next day, Kate informed David in no uncertain terms that he was an insensitive boor.’
    • ‘When you were the defending champion the next year, you were criticized by the British press for showing up late to a function and acting like a boor.’
    • ‘Adrian is a boor and worse, and Lichi finds refuge at Andrew's place.’
    • ‘And he shows that he can play something other than a loudmouthed boor.’
    • ‘I almost had him filed under arrogant boor, but then I caught him out being nice.’
    • ‘He is a smug, self-pitying boor who turns the caring doctor stereotype on its head.’
    lout, oaf, ruffian, hooligan, thug, rowdy, bully boy, brawler, rough, churl, lubber, philistine, vulgarian, yahoo, barbarian, Neanderthal, primitive, savage, brute, beast, monster
    View synonyms

Origin

Boorishness

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘peasant’): from Low German būr or Dutch boer ‘farmer’.

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